Tuesday, August 08, 2017

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Cutty Sark Museum: A Showcase of the Greatest Ship of Her Time



Quote of the day: 

Visiting a museum is a matter of going from void to void. -Robert Smithson





 Credit: Getty Images

Back in time shipping goods on high seas was the most important way of trading. Merchant ships would traverse the oceans carrying cargo for delivery in different ports. Speed was a clear advantage for any such ship. Even today with the prevalence of faster ways of moving goods such as by air, ships remain a vital part of trade worldwide.

BLOGORATTI -Cutty Sark Museum 2017

Cutty Sark, a British Clipper ship was one of such ships. Built in 1869 on the River Clyde, she was one of the fastest and also the last clipper ship to be built during that time. With the opening of the Suez Canal in the same year, it meant that steamships enjoyed shorter routes to China, so Cutty Sark spent just a couple of years in the tea trade before turning to trade in Wool from Australia. 

BLOGORATTI -Cutty Sark Museum 2017

And after a series of events the ship was sold to a Portuguese company and later exchanged several hands including British owners before it was eventually acquired by the Cutty Sark Preservation Society in 1953. The ship was named after Cutty-Sark, the nickname of the witch Nannie Dee in one of Robert Burn's poems and the figurehead (seen below) is Nannie Dee holding a horse's tail in her left hand. 

BLOGORATTI -Cutty Sark Museum 2017

Now home in Greenwich, Cutty Sark is remembered as an amazing and historic sailing ship, and the fastest and greatest of her time. It was built in Scotland in 1869 and originally built to carry tea from China to England as fast as possible. The record-breaking ship traveled to every major port in the world during her peak. 

BLOGORATTI -Cutty Sark Museum 2017

The 19th Century clipper ship has faced wars, storms, neglect and a few fire incidents. While undergoing a restoration in 2007, there was a major fire outbreak but luckily the main parts of the ship had been put in storage and so the damage was not extensive. Conservation work was carried out to raise the Cutty Sark 3 metres above ground, allowing visitors the opportunity to walk directly underneath. 

BLOGORATTI -Cutty Sark Museum 2017

BLOGORATTI -Cutty Sark Museum 2017


With the restoration Cutty Sark is not just a museum but with additional services such as a café on board, a studio theatre and a programme of workshops and family events. However admission is not free, and it requires a ticket to enter.

BLOGORATTI -Cutty Sark Museum 2017


Fun facts

1. Cutty Sark is the world's only surviving extreme clipper ship, and most of the hull fabrics on display today dates back to her original construction.

2. On her first voyage from China, Cutty Sark came back loaded with 1.3 million pounds of tea, as well as other items like wine and spirits.

3. It cost £16,150 to build the Cutty Sark and its overall length is 280 feet, and includes 32 sails and 11 miles of rigging, with a top speed of 17 knots (around 19 miles per hour).

BLOGORATTI -Cutty Sark Museum 2017

4. After being retired from the wool trade in 1895, it was sold to the Portuguese merchants who renamed her as 'Ferreira'.

5. Cutty Sark was caught in a bad storm during World War One which damaged her masts and in the process of rebuilding the masts were shortened.

BLOGORATTI -Cutty Sark Museum 2017

6. Cutty Sark is home to the world's biggest collection of figureheads -which are the carved wooden figures that adorn ships’ prows.

BLOGORATTI -Cutty Sark Museum 2017

More fun facts



Peace. Love. Light* 



Current Listen:The Dave Brubeck Quartet - Pick Up Sticks

78 comments:

  1. You gave us a fascinating tour of the ship. Well, done!

    Cutty Sark is a good scotch, too!

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    1. I am glad you enjoyed it. Not much of a scotch drinker, but I am aware of it. Many thanks!

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  2. I enjoyed the tour - I remember learning about this ship as a child and being fascinated. I've wanted to see it ever since... one day!

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    1. It is nice to know you enjoyed it all. Hopefully you will take a physical tour of this grand ship yourself soon. Greetings.

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  3. Thanks for that wonderful tour! Sure is a big ship and hold many wonderful and interesting things to see.

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    1. It surely is bigger than it looks from outside and it was a nice experience indeed. Thank for stopping by.

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  4. Quite impressive.

    A Portuguese newspaper called her "the 9 lives ship". The Portuguese company that acquired this ship was J. FERREIRA & CA.

    I would not mind visiting Cutty Sark. :)

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    1. Very impressive no doubt. And thanks for that additional information. Hopefully you will get to visit someday. Greetings!

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  5. That was a very interesting post! Loved it!

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    1. I am glad you found it so, many thanks for dropping by.

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  6. When I was a small child, we had a model of the Cutty Sark that my dad built (not in a bottle, though!). I never knew anything about the ship's history, so thanks for this very interesting post!

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    1. That must have been some treasure what your dad built. I'm glad you found it interesting and thank you.

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  7. Thanks, Mr. B. for a very informative post and some great photos too. We have seen several older sailing ships on our travels and they never cease to amaze. This one is a beauty!

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    1. Sailing ships are a wonder aren't they, I am always amazed by them too. Cutty Sark is surely a beauty. Thank you and warm greetings to you!

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  8. Great photos and a nice read... we have always loved museums... (doubt that we will be visiting another... just here in Marshville)... have a pleasant week...

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    1. Museums are loved by many, from the smallest to the largest, and good to know you love them too. I thank you for your visit.

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  9. Replies
    1. Many thanks, it is indeed fascinating to see. Greetings!

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  10. Thank you for the tour. This was well put together: in photos as well as information.

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    1. It's a little tour but I'm glad you enjoyed it all. Greetings!

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    1. The photos don't really do it justice, it is incredible to see, especially standing right underneath the ship itself. Greetings!

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  12. This is a very interesting post. I'm coming back to read it again.

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    1. Many thanks John, do feel free to stop by anytime. Greetings!

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  13. Thank you for this treat. I was in Greenwich in 2011 and saw what I could of the ship, as it was being rebuilt and not open and parts were covered. What a beautiful ship. Another interesting fact. One of President Lyndon Johnson go to drinks was Cutty Shark, a blended Scotch!

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    1. You are most welcome. I believe that was the time when the restoration was still in progress, shame you it was finished then for you to see fully, but there will always be another time to visit I think. That's an interesting fact indeed, and I believe you meant 'Cutty Sark' scotch.
      Greetings!

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  14. Very cool. Last month, there was a parade of tall ships in Boston. They are so beautiful. Thanks for the tour.

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  15. I enjoyed your post a lot. We went to Greenwich many years ago in fact at that time they were working on this exhibit. We couldn't visit which disappointment my husband who wanted to see it. I will share this post with him, and maybe we'll get back someday. Thanks for the tour. :) Erika

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  16. You have fleshed out my limited knowledge of Cutty Sark very well. It was amazing to turn a corner in Greenwich and see her there.

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  17. Its beautiful. I'd love to visit someday.

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  18. This is such an amazing post! Well done. :)


    Bloglovin
    STYLEFORMANKIND.COM

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  19. Hi Blogoratti - I went a few years ago ... before it was finished being restored - now I must go back sometime. Its history is so interesting ... and the facts you've given us - it has certainly had a good life ... and now starts another. Thanks for letting us see ... cheers Hilary

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  20. This is wonderful. Thanks for including the figureheads. What a great display. I always wanted one of those for my house!

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  21. A beautiful ship indeed. Did not know about it but are glad they restored her and share her with the public :)

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  22. Impressive!!!
    Have a nice week

    much love...

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  23. How grand that they preserved this specimen.

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  24. She's a beauty! Great to see her preserved!

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  25. Now that would be great to see. So much work sure went into them. Good they could preserve one.

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  26. Wonderful job my friend!
    Such tour was needed by my thirst for knowing more about water trafic.

    Marvellous images, really enjoyed the virtual trip with you

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  27. '11 miles'

    wow

    very cool. Tremendously enjoyed this

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  28. When my son was young, he was enamoured with tall ships. I wish we could go back in time so I could take him to visit the Cutty Sark. What a great history you have shared today!

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  29. Hello, it is a beautiful ship. I would enjoy this tour. Great photos and post. Happy Wednesday, enjoy your day!

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  30. Wow, that sure is very impressive - still I reckon you needed a lot of courage to do the job and really set off to sea in her.

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  31. The Cutty Sark is a beautiful tall ship, what about the collection of figureheads.. how fantastic is that! Quite an amazing history, thanks for sharing B ☺

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  32. Great photos! Have a fantastic day!

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  33. Another interesting read . Fabulous photos too .

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  34. I love the display of figureheads. It would have been great to see them up close. Maybe we should get one for our sailboat :-)

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  35. she sure is beautiful and wow on all those figure heads

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  36. Beautiful. I would love to tour that. Would have loved to have sailed aboard. Of course, my first thought on hearing the name was of the Whiskey.

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  37. Unlike history class in school, your history lesson was incredibly exciting.
    Thank you!! Wonderful post, Mr. B!!

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  38. The interior of this ship is beautiful. I haven't explored any ships since last at Portsmouth Dockyards - and that was a fascinating experience too!

    aglassofice.com

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  39. Old sailing boats are wonderful. And the collection of figureheads, absolutely awesome.
    Greetings !

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  40. She's holding a horse's tail? Well, that's interesting. Thanks for sharing the history behind this beautiful ship.

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  41. Such interesting and unusual boat to visit!
    And with a very fascinating story behind! :)
    XO
    S
    https://s-fashion-avenue.blogspot.it

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  42. Piękne zdjęcia :) Cieszę się, że mogłam je zobaczyć :)

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  43. Interesting Pics and great Story! Thank you :)

    lovely Greetings

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  44. Hi Blogoratti :) What a great post! Honestly (and I feel a little silly saying this) I thought Cutty Sark was simply a blended whisky! I'm glad you posted this, I love all things navel. Beautiful photos and a nice story! :)

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  45. Absolutely loved this history lesson!
    Blessings!

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  46. What a great entry. You might also enjoy the "Star of India," and the "Peking" which has just arrived at her original home port of Hamburg.

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  47. Very impressive tour with lots of history. Well done!

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  48. What a great collection of pictures!

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  49. I loved reading and looking at this post, so interesting.
    Isn't that collection of figureheads amazing, what work to make them.

    Lovely post

    All the best Jan

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  50. I would love to go on one of those big ships and walk around. That is some collection of figureheads. Now, I want to write a poem about ships (smiling)

    peace, light and love always

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  51. I had no idea that "Cutty Sark" came from a Robert Burns' poem. She's beautiful. I'd especially like to see the figure heads.

    Love,
    Janie

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  52. Belas imagens amei, obrigado pela visita.
    Blog: https://arrasandonobatomvermelho.blogspot.com.br
    Canal:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DmO8csZDARM

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  53. What a huge and lovely ship! I really enjoy reading historical facts like these! Hugs...RO

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  54. Oh WOW...this is brilliant!!
    Thank you so much for this fantastic guided tour...I am so inspired to visit this amazing ship myself now...:))

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  55. Interesting bit of maritime history.

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  56. My kind friend, you have brought back early childhood memories of when I lived in Blackheath and we'd wander over to visit the Cutty Sark.

    Gary

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  57. That was very interesting. I love museums and would love to see that one. Thanks for sharing that information.

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  58. I am so inspired to visit this amazing ship myself now...:))

    หีฟิต

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  59. "Visiting a museum is a matter of going from void to void. -Robert Smithson "

    Hmm... does that mean void, artwork, void, artwork...or is he saying art is void?

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